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In simple words, International SEO is the effort of localisation of your content and website in order to attract relevant local visitors in the countries you are entering. Consider adding this to your terms when working with affiliates and other vendors, to ensure that you have legal coverage. External links are links from websites other than your own. Google relies heavily on external links to determine how good a post is. And this makes sense, doesn't it? You can talk about yourself and your own skills all day long, but no one will believe you. But as soon as other people begin bragging about you, others take notice. However, what used to be a 7-pack system, in which the top 7-results were more heavily featured, they now use a 3-pack system.

Unconventional knowledge about 301 redirects that you won't find in books

Right now, using structured data and rich snippets will allow information from your site to appear right in the SERPs. This way, if someone searches for a recipe, they’ll be able to see the ingredients for your version before they even click on your link! Visiting a website and sticking Get your arithmetic correct - the primary resources are all available here. Its as easy as KS2 Maths or something like that... in your credit card details in return for thousands of links remains an option but presents a greater risk than ever before. White hat, grey hat, and black hat are terms used to describe the type of SEO tactics used. White hat SEOs follow the guidelines of Google and other search engines. Grey hat SEOs aren’t afraid to bend the rules a bit, while black hat SEOs blatantly break the rules. This is an issue faced by a number of different sites but is more commonly found on ecommerce sites or sites that list things (such as jobs or holidays).

The hidden agenda behind doorway sites

What is Thin Content and Why is it Bad for SEO? By Adam Snape on 20th February 2015 Categories: Content, Google, SEO

In February 2011, Google rolled out an update to its search algorithm called Panda – the first in a series of algorithm updates aimed at penalising low quality websites in search and improving the quality of their search results.

Although Panda was first rolled out several years ago (and followed by Penguin, an update aimed at knocking out black-hat SEO techniques) it’s been updated several times since its initial launch, most recently in September of 2014.

The latest Panda update has much the same purpose as the original – giving better rankings to websites that have useful and relevant content, and penalising sites that have “thin” content that offers little or no value to searchers.

In this guide, we’ll look at what makes content “thin” and why having thin content on your site is a bad thing. We’ll also share some simple tactics that you can use to give your content more value to searchers and avoid having to deal with a penalty.

What is thin content? Thin content can be identified as low quality pages that add little to no value to the reader. Examples of thin content include duplicate pages, automatically generated content or doorway pages.

The best way to measure the quality of your content is through user satisfaction. If visitors quickly bounce from your page, it likely doesn’t provide the value they were looking for.

Google’s initial Panda update was targeted primarily at content farms – sites with a massive amount of content written purely for the purpose of ranking well in search and attracting as much traffic as possible.

You’ve probably clicked your way onto a content farm before – most of us have. The content is typically packed with keywords and light on factual information, giving it big relevancy for a search engine but little value for an actual reader.

The original Panda update also targeted scraper websites – sites that “scraped” text from other websites and reposted it as their own, lifting the work of other people to generate their own search traffic.

As Panda updates keep rolling out, the focus has switched from content farms and scraper sites to websites that offer “thin” content – content that’s full of keywords and copy, but light on any real information.

A great way to think of content is as search engine food. The more unique content your website offers search engines, the more satisfied they are and the higher you will likely rank for the keywords your on-page content mentions.

Offer little food and you’ll provide little for Google to use to understand the focus of your site’s content. As a result, you’ll be outranked for your target search keywords by other websites that offer more detailed, helpful and informative content.

How can Google tell if content is thin? Google’s index includes more than 30 trillion pages, making it impossible to check every page for thin content by hand. While some websites are occasionally subject to a manual review by Google, most content is judged for its value algorithmically.

The ultimate judge of a website’s content is its audience – the readers that visit the site and actually read its content. If the content is good, they’ll probably stay on the website and keep reading; if it’s bad, there’s a good chance they’ll leave.

The length of your content isn’t necessarily an indicator of its “thinness”. As Stephen Kenwright explains at Search Engine Watch, a 2,000 word article on EzineArticles is likely to offer less value to readers than a 500 word blog post by a real expert.

One way Google can algorithmically judge the value of a website’s content is using a metric called “time to long click”. A long click is when a user clicks on a search result and stays on the website for a long time before returning to Google’s search page.

Think about how you browse a website when you discover great quality content. If a blog post or article is particularly engaging, you don’t just read for a minute or two – you click around the website and view other content as well.

A short click, on the other hand, is when a user clicks on a search result and almost immediately returns to Google’s search results page. From here, they might click on another result, indicating to Google that the first result didn’t provide much value.

Should you be worried about thin content? The best measure of your content’s value is user satisfaction. If users stay on your website for a long time after clicking onto it from Google’s search results pages, it probably has high quality, “thick” content that Google likes. Search engines also assess, in great detail, the technical aspects of your website. For example, how quickly the site loads plays a major role in your website ranking. Search engines also take into account how accessible your server is. Because, ultimately, Google and other search engines want to provide the best possible search results. So, the aim is to guide visitors to sites which work well, and which can always be accessed and used. In this chapter we’re setting the stage for how to get creatively motivated to increase traffic and learn how to kite trends. It’s no coincidence that the highest-volume keywords also tend to have the highest amount of competition, and of course, the higher the competition, the harder it’s going to be to rank for that keyword.

SEO Metatags Best Practices

This Google update put huge emphasis on the importance of ensuring that your site is mobile-friendly in terms of SEO and actual web design. If you want to earn high rankings in Google search results, you first need to understand how Google ranks its search results. The advice is to avoid duplicate content issues if you can and this should be common sense. According to Gaz Hall, a UK SEO Consultant from SEO York: "Focus on keywords that have higher search volume but don’t neglect long tail keywords. If optimized right, you can get more traffic from keywords with less search volume."

Use your outreach skills

Besides link building, social media and social bookmarking can help improve a website’s search engine standing. According The talk on Facebook is about Profile Business at the moment. to Google, website loading speed is a very important SEO factor. Google takes page loading speed into account in their website ranking algorithm. How powerful is your domain name? How well does it rank in those all-important search engines? The measure of your domain name’s power is called “domain authority,” and it depends on three general factors: size, age, and popularity. On the web, sole traders can in theory compete with the corporate big boys, so being able to be found – and found easily – among those searches is essential for any firm